Prema Rasa Siddhanta
Prema Rasa SiddhantaLanguage :English
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Prema Rasa Madira (Vol. I - III)
Prema Rasa Madira (Vol. I - III)Language :English
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ishton men radha krishna govinda radhe, bhavon men madhurya shreshta bata de
Part - 1

The one who is worshipped (ishta) or the one who is served (sevya) is of many kinds. Some are even mayic or material, such as celestial gods and goddesses. These include Indra, Varuna, Kuber and others. Such ishtas are millions in number. By acquiring spiritual understanding through the teachings of a true Saint, we come to know that the worship of a material personality results in a material consequence.
The word deva applies to both celestial beings and to Supreme God. Who is the greatest deva? Here the word deva refers to Supreme God. Similarly, the word divya (divine) refers to both material celestial beings and also to God. The word atma or soul refers to both the individual soul and God. Only Saints know which meanings apply to what words in the scriptures. Those with mere intellectual understanding of the scriptures do not have this knowledge.

One single God has many worshipable forms. These include Impersonal Brahm or Brahm and Paramatma. Paramatma as three aspects: (1) karnodakashayi paramatma (2) garbhodakashayi paramatma (3) ksirodakashayi paramatma. Even though these forms are non-different from each other, the aspect of Paramatma is superior to Impersonal Brahm.

Impersonal Brahm is completely neutral and remains this way even when loved or worshipped. Brahm is purely a divine existence. It reveals no divine powers or qualities. For example, a grain of wheat lies in a cabinet for years. An innocent person might say, “I put that grain in there thinking in ten days it would sprout and then after a month it would be a fully grown plant, but it has stayed the same for years!” A grain or seed is full of power, but this manifests only after it comes into contact with the soil, the sun, water and air. When all these are present, a seed could grow into a plant in one month. Similarly, even though Brahm possesses all divine powers, none of these are manifest. Therefore, Brahm is called avyaktashaktik – endowed with powers that remain unrevealed. Paramatma on the other hand, manifests powers, form, name and qualities, but does not perform lilas or divine pastimes, and does not have divine associates. However, do not be confused about this point – the same Brahm is Paramatma, because God is only one.

So Paramatma has three aspects. Karnodakashayi paramatma permeates uncountable worlds. Garbhodakashayi paramatma permeates one world. Ksirodakashayi paramatma resides in all our hearts, notes our thoughts and gives us the consequences of these actions. This is the object of worship for yogis. The final and supreme form of God is Shri Radha Krishna, who manifest all divine powers including divine love and divine pastimes. Brahm and Paramatma are Their other forms. 


An English translation of a discourse delivered in Hindi by:
Jagadguru Shri Kripalu Ji Maharaj
17 January 2011
Bhakti Dham, Mangarh
© Radha Govinda Samiti 
Part - 2

These three forms all pertain to the same one God, but in the form of Shri Radha Krishna every kind of divine bliss is manifest. That is why this verse says, “Out of all the worshipped forms of God, I worship Shri Radha Krishna,” there is no other form beyond this. Now let’s consider bhava or devotional sentiment. How should Shri Radha Krishna be loved or worshipped? As Almighty God? 

Arjuna listened to the teachings of the Gita from Shri Krishna on the battlefield before the Mahabharata War. Again and again Shri Krishna referred to Himself as supreme almighty God, “There is nothing beyond Me. Everything has arisen from Me. I reside in everyone’s heart.” But Arjuna thought of Shri Krishna as his friend. He said, “You keep on saying that you are almighty God; how am I to believe this? Anyone could say this. Show me how you are God!” Shri Krishna said: “How will you see this? Your eyes are mayic (material). They are made of the same material elements as this world. Your body and senses are made of material elements and after your death they will merge into material elements. But I am divine. My body is not made of material elements.”

The Padma Purana explains that the body and soul are separate in all living beings, including celestial gods and goddesses. In God’s case, however God’s body and soul are one. Shri Krishna asked Arjuna: “So how will you see My divine body with your material eyes?” The material eye can only see material objects of the world – provided a person has good eyesight and sufficient light is present. These two conditions must be met. Even so, we can see only a limited distance, and small objects such as atoms are imperceptible to us, even with magnification. So with what feeling should we love God? Even the celestial gods and goddesses are terrified of God in His almighty form. 

When Nrisimha (the half-man half-lion descension of God) appeared on Earth to kill Hiranyakashipu (a demon who out of pride opposed the Lord) all the celestial gods and goddesses said, “We must give thanks to Him. He appeared in our world to kill such a terrible demon. But He is manifesting such a scary and angry form! Who will go first?” They said, “Brahma, you are His son. You go.” Brahma said, “No, not now.” They then said, “Shiva, you have the power to reduce this world to ashes. Please go.” Lord Shiva also said, “No, I won’t go right now.” Finally they decided, “Send for Prahlada and let him go first. After all, God appeared on his account. When He sees Prahlada, He will cool down. Then we will all go to Him.” When Lord Nrisimha saw Prahlada, He started smiling. He took Prahlada in His lap and affectionately hugged and stroked him, as you see parents do with their children. Then all the celestial gods and goddesses, and Brahma, Vishnu and Shiva came forward with songs of praise.


An English translation of a discourse delivered in Hindi by:
Jagadguru Shri Kripalu Ji Maharaj
17 January 2011
Bhakti Dham, Mangarh
© Radha Govinda Samiti
Part - 3

So Shri Krishna said to Arjuna: “First I will bestow on you divine vision, then afterward you will see God.” He graced Arjuna with divine eyes so that Arjuna could see His almighty form. But Arjuna started to tremble in fear; he shut his eyes, he started perspiring. Stammering he said, “I don’t want to look! You really are Almighty God! Until now I had no idea. I always accepted You as my friend. Please forgive me!” So if you worship God’s almighty form, you will not be able to love Him. Instead you will feel afraid. However, God says: “My children do not think of Me as a supreme almighty power. Relate to Me in the same way you relate to others in the world.”

The first type of relational feeling with God is that of dasya bhava, the love of a servant for his master. Now our devotional feelings have a way to develop because a master is benign, not angry. In the world we see there are servants in homes. A Prime Minister or President has a Personal Assistant, but the familiarity a servant is entitled to with his master is very restricted. The Ramayana says when Lord Rama, Lakshman and Sita Ji were leaving Ayodhya to enter the forest, Lakshman would walk behind Lord Rama and Sita Ji in such a way so that he would not step on their footprints. How difficult this is! A true servant instead places only his head wherever his Guru places his feet. Does this mean we have to walk on our head? How is this possible? What this implies is the role of a servant is very difficult. There are many rules of propriety that must be observed.

Beyond this is sakhya bhava, the relational feeling of a friend to a friend. What does a friend do? He places his arm around his friend’s shoulders and informally asks, “Hey, where did you go today?” Still, the rights of a friend are also restricted. Beyond this is vatsalya bhava, the relational feeling between a parent and child. In this bhava God is loved as your child. You may spank Him, twist His ear and scold Him for being naughty. You may request, “Son, please bring my slippers,” and He will have to bring them! He has become your son. But even this feeling of love still has some restrictions.

Beyond this is madhurya bhava. This is the relational feeling of a lover and a beloved. This is not the same as the love between a husband and wife. The feelings of a lover and beloved are even beyond this. A woman’s husband is at home, but she secretly loves another. This quality of love, which was the love of the Braja gopis for Shri Krishna is called jar prem


An English translation of a discourse delivered in Hindi by:
Jagadguru Shri Kripalu Ji Maharaj
17 January 2011
Bhakti Dham, Mangarh
© Radha Govinda Samiti

Part - 4

Love in madhurya bhava is selfless. This is its uniqueness. Selfless means with no personal desire for one’s happiness. The other unique quality of this bhava is one may think of God as one’s beloved, one’s child, one’s friend or one’s master. However, those who love God with any of the lower types of relational feelings may not think of Him with the intimacy of madhurya bhava. They do not have this right. A devotee who thinks of God as his master, cannot love Him as a friend let alone as a beloved. If any servant were to place his arm around his master’s shoulders, his master would scold him and say, “What is this nonsense? Maintain your distance!” A servant is not entitled to this kind of closeness.

The feelings of a lover and beloved are the most intimate. Whatever the lover asks, the beloved must do. A wife, on the other hand, cannot speak like this to her husband. She has to abide by the rules of propriety that relate to her prescribed duties as a wife. There are many social rules that relate to this kind of relationship. A wife cannot say to her husband, “Son, come here.” Her husband would think, “She called me ‘son’?” His next thought might be to send her to the hospital for treatment. But God gives us the right to love Him with all these relational feelings in madhurya bhava. We may relate to Him and love Him as a Beloved, as a Son, as a Friend and as a Master.

What is the nature of selfless devotion? People are very confused about this, including those who are supposedly learned. There are two areas – maya’s area and God’s area. For this reason there are two kinds of desires – desires for material things related to the world and desires related to God. Therefore, selflessness or niskhamata is of two kinds. One kind is directed towards the world and the other kind is directed towards God. To have worldly desires is only natural. We perceive the world before us and so we form worldly desires thinking that by fulfilling them we will attain happiness. If clarified butter is poured on a fire, the flames reduce as if the fire is being extinguished, but then they rise up again. Similarly, when we fulfil worldly desires, these desires do not come to an end, they only grow stronger. 

The verse in the Vedas (Narada Parivrajaka Upanishad 3.37) is also in the Bhagavatam, Vishnu Purana and the Padma Purana and it says that worldly desires don’t come to end when they are fulfilled; they grow stronger. A poor person thinks, “If only I could have $100,000.” After attaining this, he starts thinking, “$100,000 is nothing. I want $200,000!” Desires keep on growing like this. The greatest billionaires feel distressed that in the coming year someone else’s wealth will surpass theirs. Even in an ordinary family it is seen that if one person is more financially successful than the others, those who have less feel jealous. This is also seen in the celestial abodes. 


An English translation of a discourse delivered in Hindi by:
Jagadguru Shri Kripalu Ji Maharaj
17 January 2011
Bhakti Dham, Mangarh
© Radha Govinda Samiti


to be continued next week...
jaga kamana hai shatru govind radhe, vako hari or mori mitra bana de >>